rahrighouse projects | lights, camera, action!

Processed with VSCO with f2 presetI’ve been quiet for a while, I know. But, I’ve had a realllllly good reason. A totally unexpected, never could have predicted, one-in-a-million reason:

Basically, we’ve lived THE dream. You know – the dream you have when you’re the type of person who binge-watches Property Brothers, have designed your “tiny house” in your head, and whisper “shiplap” as you drift off to sleep most nights…

That’s right, folks. The Rahrigs, and our sweet little Connecticut home, are going to be ON TV!


It alllll started when we received a knock on our door on a rainy day in February. The Husband was out of the house, I was upstairs with the little guy who was grouchily waking up from a nap, and the last thing I wanted to do was run down to see who was there (like, we had two friends so far in CT… maybe it was the mail lady?). I finished getting T settled, looked through the window on the off-chance someone was still there, and noticed a truck in the driveway. I cautiously walked down the stairs, and saw a man in a baseball cap jogging up to our doorway. With a big grin, and a ton of energy, this stranger started excitedly talking…

“My name is Eric, I’m with HGTV and we think YOUR HOUSE IS PERFECT...”


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|I mean, it IS pretty cute…|


askdjfhalskdjfh. What? I thought, as I stood there with no makeup, in my socks, with the door cracked.  Was I hard-of-hearing?… He started again:

“We are doing this great new show, I’m the host, and we’re looking for a historic New England home, and a young family! Your realtor sent me over! The concept is that we are maximizing and getting creative with space that might be usually ignored…”

askldjfhajskdfh. Huuuuuuh? I was visibly scoffing at this point. Like, this sounded too good to be true, right? Or, I just finished a nine-week renovation and barely escaped with my sanity, so NO I do NOT want any more construction within 100 MILES OF MYSELF ever, ever, ever agin, right?

But, he seemed genuine enough. So, I let him finish talking. And I kindly took his name and number, thanked him, closed the door, and called the husband to tell him this hilarious story… Little did I know where this random happening would take us!

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Fast-forward a few months, and our home is now more lovely than I could have imagined. And, the husband has fulfilled his lifelong dream to be a tv star. And maybe Titus has a future on Law & Order. And, we had the adventure of a lifetime.

SO, tune in to the *DIY Network on Wednesday, August 3 at 8:00p.m. to watch Amazing Space and see the new and improved RahrigHouse in all of its glory! UPDATE: Watch on the HGTV Network on Saturday, August 27 at Noon!

Also, a VERY special shout-out to my mom, sister Bekah and sister-in-law Jessica for lots of couch sleeping, box and furniture moving and babysitting during the process!

You can see more of our home renovation adventures here, and expect updates here at FreshlyMinted soon!

AMAZING SPACE LOGO

*DIY is the HGTV sister network. The show will likely air on HGTV at a later date – we’ll keep you posted!

 

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{Vintage} Wisdom

Meet Ora Bliss Adams.

Ora is my great-grandmother, and she just turned 96 this week. Always (and still) a bright, strong, fashionable lady; a long chat with her can change your life… So, in her honor,  I’ve decided to pass on a little of her wisdom…

You don’t have it today like we did back then… and I’m sorry.

About “Grandma Bailey”

Ora was born in a small town in rural Ohio in 1915. She was the youngest of seven children, and her mother passed away when she was just 20 months old. Her kind, loving father and her oldest sister, Wilma, raised her and her siblings.

They studied hard, worked hard, baked, cooked, plowed, slaughtered, milked, churned, laughed, grieved, danced, survived and learned a lot about life on their self-sufficient farm…

Grandma graduated from high school, and married Joe Washington Bailey when she was 18 years old. Their first car was his brand new 1930 Ford Sport Roadster….red and black with a rumble seat. She says it was quite the sight…

She and my grandfather also led busy, involved, generous, hard working lives. They farmed for many years,  had two children: Viora Sue and Steve. “Sue” is my grandmother – my mom’s mother…

Grandma still lives on their 114 acre farm, today.

I can still see the horses, the people, the farms…

Living a long, happy life

There are many themes that run through Grandma’s life, but I would say that hard work, health and fashion tended to stand out. I think she’d agree that the lists below contributed to her seeing her 96th birthday.

Her thoughts about life are precious to me, and luckily, she has an almost photographic memory… Here are just a few for you to take to heart:

Ora’s Fashion Tips

(Circa 1940-60, but still applicable today)

{Sue’s wedding, 1958 – What a dress, what a color.}

1. An A-line dress is possibly the most flattering cut there is. No matter what your waist or hips are like, it can look nice on everyone. (I totally agree!)

2. NEVER wear pleats. They make you look fat. (Proud to say I made the husband throw out all of his pleated pants right after we got married… now this is great advice).

3. Buy versatile pieces – Mix and match your jackets, skirts and slacks. (But, slacks are mostly worn for bowling and farm work…. She’s a member of the national “600 Bowlers Club”, by the way.)

4. DON’T buy cheap shoes. It just isn’t worth it. She’s 96 and has no foot problems and can walk wherever she pleases. She said it is all about quality. (“Tweedies” were her favorite brand. This ad is from a 1956 “Woman’s Home Companion” magazine she gave me. Grandma said that they were $80 a pair in the 1940’s – Whew! Told the Husband about this tip right away…)

Ora’s Health Tips

(On the farm, or in your back yard…try a few)


We ate food that we grew, harvested and butchered…we baked our own bread, had three orchards and 13 swarms of bees…  Dad would always take apples and honey to the neighbors.

1. Eat like a farmer. Grandma ate local food when it was in season. They canned what they didn’t eat immediately, baked, used a root cellar, and never went hungry – even during The Depression and WWII. (You might not be able to eat only what you can grow, but try to stay local, eat what is ripe, and experiment with recipes that call for whole, nutrient rich foods.)

2. Sweets are a treat. It was a big deal to get sweets and penny candies, not a habit. Keep it a special event to share with others. (Even though you don’t have to trudge three miles through mud-covered roads to get your candy bars any more, act like you do…)

3. Walk, run, ride, move. Make it a natural part of your routine. Grandma said they walked everywhere, and didn’t even think about it. She claims it has made all the difference in her health and mobility today… They also rode horses, planted seeds, sweated and milked cows twice a day – Now that’s an arm workout!. (Three miles to church on Sunday, and countless miles there and back to school, to the neighbors, and around the farm.)

4. Dance. In the winter, Grandma’s family held square dances to entertain and keep moving even in bad weather. They rolled up the carpet, found someone to play the violin or banjo, and friends, family and neighbors danced the night away. (While you might not square dance this winter to keep holiday pounds off, try Zumba or a new workout to mix things up.)

{The picture above to the left is of my great-great grandparents. They were married in 1895. The picture above and to the right is of Ora with her dog – She put waves in her hair by standing over a teakettle.}

We worked hard…we led a good life.

I have said that I love stories, and Grandma’s stories are some of the best. I am proud of her and my family, and am thankful to know more about who we are, and where we have been… I challenge you to take the time to find out some of your own stories. You might be surprised at what you find.

{The picture above is one of my favorites. Love the collar and stripes. My Grandma and uncle are pictured with her… See how the fashion sense was passed down?}

{Grandma’s home – A place where joy and memories reside}